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Appalachian State University Department of Art

Courses

Art Education Art History Art Management clay drawing fibers foundations Graphic Design Honors Metalsmithing & Jewelry Design painting photography printmaking Sculpture Courses for All Art Majors Courses for Studio Art Majors Minors & Non-Majors

Courses

Art Education

ART 2016. Introduction to Contemporary Issues in Art and Design
This course will fulfill requirements for an Art Minor and is an elective possibility for majors in Art Management, Art History and Art Education.

An introductory exploration of contemporary studio practice, with a specific thematic focus. Students will use sketchbook development, material experimentation, and visual research in their study of specific class themes. Projects will introduce a variety of two dimensional, three dimensional, and time-based media. Sample themes may include contemporary ideas in international culture, technology, history, and social and environmental causes. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

ART 2222. Introduction to Art Education
Prerequisite: admission into the Art Department.

This introductory course in art education will cover: current practices and philosophies in art education; multiple histories of art education; assessment as artifact; teacher as listener; and the role of materials to support, integrate, and challenge the artistic growth of young people in school. Students will learn how to create a lesson plan based on a provocation in an emergent integrative curriculum. Students will observe different teaching settings with perceptual, societal and artistic analysis implicit in programs observed. Participation in Saturday morning art workshops is expected.

ART 2420. The Child as Cultural Construct
Prerequisite: ENG 2001 or its equivalent. (WRITING) GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

Students will study the cultural, empirical, and personal image of the child and how these collective beliefs influence the practice of art education. Specific topics include: recognizing the child as cultural construct, the teacher and child as co-constructors of knowledge, the value of a child's aesthetic, and authentic assessment. The class will be a combination of written responses, class discussions, research observations, technological applications and a community collaborative art experience as it relates to contemporary visual culture, the image of the child and to the child's art making. Theories of art education that illuminate the vital importance of personal experience, public memory, intertextuality, and cultural narrative will be examined. Various models for assessing student performance will be studied with special attention given to creating assessment tools that deconstruct the practice of knower and non-knower and construct practical instruments.

ART 2444. Materials and Processes in Art Education
Prerequisite: admission into the Art Department.

This course will offer an in-depth and sustained exploration of the properties, structures, and expressive uses of selected art materials. The course aims to enrich and extend personal visual repertoires and in parallel, provoke insights into the role of materials in supporting, integrating and challenging the artistic growth of young people in school.

ART 3021. Visual Art in the Elementary School

A general orientation to visual art teaching/learning for the elementary level teacher. Students will study visual culture as it relates to children’s art-making and the larger world. The class offers a studio experience with ongoing sketchbook assignments. There is a practicum requirement outside of class time where students implement art education theories and methods in an actual teaching situation and perform a child study based on art education meaning-based pedagogy. Lecture two hours per week, studio two hours per week, plus observations and teaching experiences outside of class time are required. (Note: Those pursuing a second concentration in visual arts should take ART 2420 instead of ART 3021.)

ART 3022. Art Education: Birth Through Six—Making Sense of the World

Focusing on the child, ages birth through six, this course is based on a theory of visual culture: the questioning of developmental stages, the image of the child as a cultural convention, personal narrative, meaningful art practice, and recognizing art as a dialogue between individuals and culture. Readings, written responses, discussions will be based on what we know collectively about the growth and development of the young child, good teaching practice, and critical pedagogy. The class will offer studio experiences, observations and teaching experiences. Students will design and implement a case study. Lecture two hours per week, studio two hours per week, plus observations and teaching experiences outside of class time are required.

ART 3420. Art Education: Field Experiences
Prerequisite: ART 2420 or permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a total credit of nine semester hours.

Students will devise curricula and teach various populations in the public schools and other community settings. Lecture two hours per week, laboratory two hours per week, plus observations and teaching experiences outside of class time are required. (SPEAKING)

ART 3969. Art Education and the Exceptional Learner
Prerequisite: admission into the Art Department.

This course prepares the art educator to meet the needs of students with identified disabilities (K-12). The role of the art teacher in inclusive classrooms (those that include students with and without disabilities) as well as in self-contained classrooms (those containing only students with identified disabilities) will be addressed. Teacher candidates observe, analyze and evaluate a variety of K-12 art experiences involving children with exceptionalities. The course teaches the modification of art tools and the development of teaching strategies to allow all students to make art. Students will participate with the SPE 4205 (Inclusion) course and will also have a practicum experience.

ART 4420. Art Education Special Topics
Prerequisite: ART 2420

This course explores a particular current issue in art education each semester. May be repeated with different topics for a total credit of nine semester hours. Lecture two hours, laboratory/studio two hours.

Art History

ART 2016. Introduction to Contemporary Issues in Art and Design
This course will fulfill requirements for an Art Minor and is an elective possibility for majors in Art Management, Art History and Art Education.

An introductory exploration of contemporary studio practice, with a specific thematic focus. Students will use sketchbook development, material experimentation, and visual research in their study of specific class themes. Projects will introduce a variety of two dimensional, three dimensional, and time-based media. Sample themes may include contemporary ideas in international culture, technology, history, and social and environmental causes. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

ART 2030. Art from Prehistory to 1400
GEN ED: Fine Arts Designation; Historical and Social Perspective (Themes: "Ancient Worlds" and "Religion, Myth, and Society")

A global survey of art history focusing on the early visual artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas from the dawn of art to 1400. The course examines visual art and art making in religious, social, cultural, and political contexts. Lecture three hours.

ART 2130. Art from 1400 to the Present
GEN ED: Fine Arts Designation; Aesthetic Perspective (Theme: "Traditions and Innovations"); Local to Global Perspective (Theme: "Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization")

A global survey of art history from 1400 to the present examining the later artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas. The course focuses on visual art and art making in light of changing social, political, religious, and cultural circumstances. Lecture three hours.

ART 2230. History of Graphic Design

A historical survey of visual communication, this course highlights key graphic designers and meta-disciplinary creative thinkers who have shaped significant innovations in the field. Examining relevant artistic, cultural, and technological events provides a context for understanding contemporary graphic design practice. Lecture three hours.

ART 3400. Women Artists
Prerequisite: ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

This course will provide a historical and contemporary survey of women visual artists. Lecture three hours. (WRITING)

ART 3600. History of Modern Art
Prerequisites: ART 2130 or consent of the instructor and ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

A survey of leading movements in modern art from the 1870’s to 1945. Lecture three hours. (WRITING)

ART 3610. Asian Art
Prerequisite: ART 2030 or ART 2130 or permission of the instructor.

The art forms of three Asian cultures — India, China, and Japan are explored. Particular attention is devoted to painting, sculpture, and architecture as well as the unique forms of each culture.

ART 3630. African Art
Prerequisites: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor and ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

This course explores major themes in the study of the visual arts in Africa. Works of art from the ancient rock paintings of the Sahara, through the ancient artistic traditions of Ife and Benin, to the arts of the colonial and post colonial periods are presented. Diverse forms of art works are studied in their social, religious, and political contexts. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; MULTI-CULTURAL)

ART 3650. Art of Late Antiquity
Prerequisites: ART 2030 or consent of the instructor and ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

A course in the Late Antique art, covering early Christian, Byzantine and early Islamic art. Focus on the social context of ancient art production and reception. Lecture three hours. (WRITING)

ART 3700. Oceanic Art
Prerequisites: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor and ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

This course examines the visual arts of the Pacific Islands, Australia, New Zealand, and New Guinea, including tattooing and other body adornment practices, architecture, sculpture, and textiles. The course explores the ways oceanic arts since the 18th century embody resistance and survival through the continuity of traditional art forms as well as work in more contemporary media and styles. Lecture three hours. (WRITING)

ART 3705. Contemporary Art of Africa
Prerequisite: ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

This course examines themes in the study of the recent visual arts of Africa and the Caribbean during the colonial and post-colonial period. This course explores the ways that artistic production reflects its local background and circumstances as it enters into a dialog with a global art scene. The course will examine art as a sensitive barometer of social, cultural, religious, and political changes in modern Africa and the Caribbean. Lecture three hours. (WRITING)

ART 3710. Ancient Egyptian Art
Prerequisites: ART 2030 or permission of the instructor and ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

A course in the history of Egyptian art, from archaic through early Christian periods. Focus is on the social context of ancient art production and reception. The course includes critical reading, writing, and discussion. Lecture three hours. (WRITING)

ART 3730. Native Arts of the Americas
Prerequisites: sophomore standing or permission of the instructor and ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

This course explores the native arts and architecture of North America, Central America and South America. Diverse forms of artworks are studied in their social, religious, and political contexts. The focus of the course may be in any of the three major cultural regions, from prehistory to the present. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; MULTICULTURAL)

ART 3750. History of Roman Art
Prerequisites: ART 2030 or consent of the instructor and ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

A course in the history of Roman art, from archaic through early Christian periods. Focus on the social context of ancient art production and reception. Lecture three hours. (WRITING)

ART 3760. History of American Craft

This course will consider the development of American studio craft from a historical perspective and continuing to the present day, considering craft objects as discreet entities and in relation to other creative output. Lecture three hours.

ART 3800. Art Since 1945
Prerequisites: ART 2130 or consent of the instructor and ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

A survey of leading movements in contemporary art from 1945 to the present. Lecture three hours. (WRITING)

ART 3810. Photography and Culture
Prerequisites: ART 2130 or permission of the instructor and ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

This course invites students to develop a critical understanding of the relationship between photography and culture. Readings, lectures, presentations and discussions on historical and contemporary photographers will be incorporated into the coursework. Lecture three hours. (WRITING)

ART 3820. History of Museums and Collecting
Prerequisites: ART 2130 or permission of the instructor and ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

A seminar in the history of museums and collecting, focusing on the 19th century through today. Major emphasis is placed on critical reading, writing, and discussion. Lecture three hours. (WRITING)

ART 4030. Seminar in Art Criticism and Theory
Prerequisites: ART 2030 and ART 2130, or consent of the instructor. GEN ED: Capstone Experience

A seminar in the theory and criticism of art in which leading methods of analysis are examined through readings and discussion. Major emphasis is placed upon the student developing a critical sense of art. Lecture three hours. (WRITING; SPEAKING)

ART 4040. Seminar in Art History
Prerequisites: ART 2030, ART 2130 and ENG 2001 or its equivalent. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID)

This advanced seminar in art history will focus on in-depth inquiry into a particular period, theme, place or genre in art history. Content will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated barring duplication of content for a total credit of 12 semester hours. Lecture three hours. (WRITING)

Art Management

ART 2016. Introduction to Contemporary Issues in Art and Design
This course will fulfill requirements for an Art Minor and is an elective possibility for majors in Art Management, Art History and Art Education.

An introductory exploration of contemporary studio practice, with a specific thematic focus. Students will use sketchbook development, material experimentation, and visual research in their study of specific class themes. Projects will introduce a variety of two dimensional, three dimensional, and time-based media. Sample themes may include contemporary ideas in international culture, technology, history, and social and environmental causes. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

ART 3013. Introduction to New York/Washington Art Scene

The ASU-NY Loft and/or the Appalachian House in Washington are bases from which visiting groups of students will experience the art museums and galleries in each city. Trips to these cities, organized by art faculty, allow students to gain one semester hour credit. Individual projects are assigned by the instructor leading each trip. May be repeated for a total of three hours credit.

ART 3112. Art Exhibitions in Contemporary Culture
Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

This seminar surveys current practices of exhibiting art in a variety of contexts and cultural institutions including museums, galleries, online and other exhibition sites. Students conduct research on contemporary exhibition practices and take field trips to explore current exhibitions and museum installations. Lecture three hours.

ART 4012. Exhibitions Practicum
Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

This practicum course introduces students to the fundamental principles and practical responsibilities of managing and maintaining art exhibitions. Students gain experience planning, promoting, designing, and installing exhibitions and events in the Smith Gallery. Lecture and practicum four hours.

ART 4900. Internship: Field Experience
GEN ED: Capstone Experience

An on-the-job experience with artists, museums, galleries, and business related to the promotion of art professions. Graded on an S/U basis.

Clay

ART 2007. Clay I: Handbuilding
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1002, or ART 1020 or ART 1021.

An introduction to clay as a material and means of expression, with emphasis on the development of content with hand-formed objects. Consideration will be given to ceramic history in relation to contemporary practice. Students will develop critical and reflective thinking skills in relation to their studio production through research, writing, discussions and presentations. Studio six hours.

ART 2040. Clay I: Mold-Making and Casting
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1002, or ART 1020 or ART 1021

An introduction to the materials and methods particular to the creative use of ceramic mold-making and casting. Students will develop critical and reflective thinking skills with regard to their studio production through research, writing, discussions and presentations. Focus will be on employing ceramic processes and fi ring methods relevant to content. Studio six hours.

ART 2050. Clay: Methods and Materials
Prerequisite or corequisite: any level I clay course (ART 2007, ART 2016 in clay, ART 2040, or ART 2107) or permission of the instructor.

This course involves hands-on working experience with ceramic raw materials and the formulation of clay bodies and fired surfaces, with an emphasis on accurate testing and recording methods. Students are expected to assess and apply the results of this materials research to the conceptual development of their work. Studio six hours.

ART 2107. Clay I: Throwing
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1002, or ART 1020 or ART 1021.

An introduction to clay as a material, using the potter’s wheel as a tool to generate form and express ideas. Technical skill and concept development will be emphasized. Students will develop critical and reflective thinking skills with regard to studio practice through research, writing, discussions and presentations. Studio six hours.

ART 3007. Clay II: Handbuilding
Prerequisite: ART 2007 and portfolio review or permission of the instructor.

An in-depth exploration of processes and firing methods with hand-formed clay. Emphasis is on the development of conceptual skills and an individual approach. Structured and student-generated assignments will integrate technical skill with creative insight. Studio six hours.

ART 3040. Clay II: Mold-Making and Casting
Prerequisite: ART 2040 and portfolio review or permission of the instructor.

An in-depth exploration of molds and casting to attain broader technical and conceptual skills in clay and mixed media. Coursework will include installation, site specific and collaborative endeavors. Structured and student-generated assignments will bridge technical awareness and creative insight. Studio six hours.

ART 3107. Clay II: Throwing
Prerequisite: ART 2107 and portfolio review or permission of the instructor.

An in-depth exploration of wheel-thrown clay to attain broader technical and conceptual skills. Emphasis is on the development of critical thinking and an individual approach to materials and processes through structured and student-generated assignments which will bridge technical awareness and creative insight. Studio six hours.

ART 4307. Special Topics in Advanced Clay
Prerequisites: two of the following Clay I courses: ART 2007, ART 2040, ART 2107; and one of the following Clay II courses: ART 3007, ART 3040, ART 3107.

An advanced self-directed study with in-depth individual research, exploration and production with regard to materials, processes and concepts. Emphasis is on critical thinking. Students are expected to create a body of work that demonstrates their level of knowledge, skills and abilities acquired in studies to date. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

Drawing

ART 2103. Drawing II
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1003, or ART 1020 or ART 1021.

An exploration of contemporary drawing practices, focusing on process, experimentation, content development, and refining observational drawing skills. Class projects address creative problem-solving in composition, visualization, and graphic expression. Emphasis is on the figure as a subject matter and drawing from the live model. Introduction to a broader range of drawing media, including color and collage. Studio six hours.

ART 3103. Contemporary Issues in Advanced Drawing
Prerequisite: ART 2103 and portfolio review

A further exploration of contemporary drawing practices, with a specific thematic focus. Students will use sketchbook development, material experimentation, and visual research to create an independent body of work. Class themes include the human figure, narrative and sequential art, illustration, process and abstraction, and digital drawing media. All classes will examine the cross-cultural development of drawing in art history, and students will also have the opportunity to explore a variety of contemporary aesthetic approaches. Studio six hours.

ART 4300. Special Topics in Advanced Painting and Drawing
Prerequisites: ART 2100, ART 3100, and ART 3200 or ART 3103

This is an advanced painting and drawing studio course designed to develop personal vision and critical thinking. Emphasis is on the evolution of formal practice and self-evaluation. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

Fibers

ART 2008. Fibers: Materials and Processes
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1003, or ART 1020 or ART 1021.

A general introduction to a broad range of basic fibers processes and materials, such as dyeing and block printing, papermaking, felt-making, tapestry and wearables. Emphasis is on the development of technical fibers skills with application to individual works of art and design. Studio six hours.

ART 2601. Textile Design
Prerequisite: registration is restricted to students majoring in the B.S. degree in Apparel and Textiles, or by permission of the instructor.

An introduction to weaving and surface design techniques. Emphasis is on material selection, color theory and image sources as applicable to the development of individual textile designs. Studio six hours.

ART 2602. Fibers: Weaving I
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1003, or ART 1020 or ART 1021.

An introduction to the weaving loom as an art-making tool, through basic weave structures, hand-manipulated weaves and weavedrafting. Emphasis is on the selection of materials, woven structures, and color theory as related to the development of individual works of art and design. Studio six hours.

ART 3017. Fibers: Weaving II
Prerequisite: ART 2601 or ART 2602 and portfolio review.

Further exploration of weaving as a technique for art-making. Emphasis is on the development of critical thinking and technical weaving skills with application to individual works of art and design. Includes integrations with other fibers processes and techniques. Studio six hours.

ART 3208. Fibers: Surface Design I
Prerequisite: ART 2008 or ART 2601 and portfolio review.

An exploration of fabric surface design materials and processes, such as dye applications, screen-printing and repeat patterning. Emphasis is on critical thinking and development of technical skills with application to individual works of art and design. Studio six hours.

ART 3308. Fibers: Structure I
Prerequisite: ART 2008 and portfolio review.

An exploration of various three-dimensional fibers techniques, such as off-loom structural processes, paper forms and found materials. Emphasis is on critical thinking and development of technical skills with application to individual works of art and design. Studio six hours.

ART 3408. Fibers: Surface Design II
Prerequisite: ART 3208 and portfolio review.

Further exploration of surface design processes as techniques for art-making. Emphasis is on critical thinking and development of technical skills with application to individual works of art and design. Integrations with other fibers processes and techniques. Studio six hours.

ART 3508. Fibers: Structure II
Prerequisite: ART 3308 and portfolio review.

Further exploration of structural fibers processes as techniques for art-making. Emphasis is on critical thinking and development of technical skills with application to individual works of art and design. Integrations with other fibers processes and techniques. Studio six hours.

ART 4308. Special Topics in Advanced Fibers Studio
Prerequisites: three of the following fibers courses: ART 2008, ART 2602, ART 3017, ART 3208, ART 3308, ART 3408, ART 3508.

A self-directed studio production course in fibers with additional research, presentations, and critiques with fibers faculty and other advanced students. The majority of goals and projects will be proposed by the students with the instructor's approval. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

Foundations

ART 1001. Foundations I

Basic introduction to two-dimensional design emphasizing the structural elements of art, the principles of visual organization, and the psychological effects of visual decision making. Color theory, including schematic uses and historical and psychological aspects, will be explored along with the application of color mixing and color integration. There will be an introduction to the critical and analytical approaches to the visual arts. Studio six hours.

ART 1002. Foundations II

This course is the second half of an introduction to the structural elements of art. It examines the organizational principles of three-dimensional design and the study of equipment and materials used in this area of art making. Emphasis is on three-dimensional vocabulary, understanding of sculptural space, the use of hand and power tools, materials manipulation, and processes related to three-dimensional art. Studio six hours.

ART 1003. Foundations Drawing

An introduction to drawing as a primary means of visual investigation. Major class topics include drawing from observation and visualization (drawing from imagination). Class exercises focus on rendering objects, spaces, and the human figure in basic wet and dry media (graphite, charcoal, and ink). Conceptual and process-centered approaches in contemporary drawing will be introduced. Studio six hours.

ART 1005. Foundations Seminar

This course is a global introduction to the theory and practice of the visual arts, and it also introduces students to many of the institutional resources available for the aspiring visual artist. It includes an overview of art world institutions and their relevance to understanding the artist's role in the world today; the relationship among art history, art theory and studio practice; and issues central to attaining professional competency such as preparing artists' statements, documenting one's work, and researching educational and funding sources. Studio six hours.

Graphic Design

ART 1102. Introduction to Graphic Design
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1003.

This is an introductory level course for students entering the field of graphic design. It involves studio inquiry into the nature of visual communication. The course is structured to foster a personal approach to the design process and the ability to critically discuss design. Topics introduced in the course include typography, symbols, contemporary design practice and the relationship between designer, audience and message. Work produced in this course allows for the discovery of the language, creative problem-solving processes and technologies fundamental to graphic design. This course may be taken at the same time as, but not before ART 2102. Studio six hours.

ART 2102. Typography I
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1003.

A concentration in the study of typography. Course includes a survey of major typographical trends, analysis of letterforms, typesetting methods and the use of type in layout design. This course may be taken at the same time as, but not before ART 1102. Studio six hours.

ART 2104. Digital Imaging
Prerequisites: ART 1001, ART 1002, and ART 1003.

This course introduces the student to technical and aesthetic aspects of digital image manipulation for artists and designers. Studio six hours.

ART 2230. History of Graphic Design

A historical survey of visual communication, this course highlights key graphic designers and meta-disciplinary creative thinkers that have shaped significant innovations in the field. Examining relevant artistic, cultural, and technological events provides a context for understanding contemporary graphic design practice. Lecture three hours.

ART 2302. Calligraphy
Prerequisite: ART 1001 or permission of the instructor.

An introduction to hand-lettering. Both monoline and edged-pen lettering styles are studied in their historical context, including Roman capitals, minuscules, and Italic styles. The application of color to letter forms will be examined, as well as various methods of page composition, surface decoration and bookbinding will be studied. Studio six hours.

ART 3102. Typography II
Prerequisites: ART 1001, ART 1002, ART 1003, ART 1102, ART 2102 and Graphic Design Candidacy Portfolio Review.

Second course in the typography sequence focusing on the design of multiple pages, an introduction to publication design, basic typographic systems, and typographic hierarchy. An introduction to the use of type with image and the surface design of three-dimensional form with be studied. Studio six hours.

ART 3202. Interaction Design I
Prerequisites: Art 2026, Art 2103, Art 2104 and Art 3102.

An intermediate graphic design course involving complex interactive projects for the Web and other technologies using standards-compliant HTML and CSS. Students will learn the application of semantic code markup and gain an understanding of the separation of content and form in dynamic media. Alternate forms of scripting for the web, animation and motion graphics, and interaction with databases will also be introduced. Studio six hours.

ART 3302. Idea Lab
Prerequisites: ART 1102 and ART 2102.

The course will function as a creative laboratory, providing students the opportunity to be immersed in and mindful of the design process. Course topics include innovation methodologies, design processes, visualization, prototyping and testing. Through exercises, readings, research and studio projects, students will develop lifelong skills to foster the good ideas that lead to meaningful creative work. Students who do not pass Candidacy Portfolio Review before starting this course will be required to drop the course. Studio six hours.

ART 3312. Motion Graphics
Prerequisite: Art 2104 or permission of instructor

This is an intensive course in time-based media for artists and designers. Students will create broadcast quality animation and compositing projects for television, web and other technologies. Students will use type and images to learn a variety of production techniques in digital audio, digital video, animation and other special effects. Postproduction presentation techniques targeting the broadcast and theatrical industry, the Web and other technologies will be covered. Studio six hours.

ART 3322. Sign, Symbol, Image
Prerequisites: ART 2104 and ART 3102.

An introductory study of signs, symbols and images in the context of graphic communication. The course includes theoretical and practical considerations of the relationship between visual form and cultural meaning. Course projects address visual perception and interpretation, abstraction and stylization, symbol typologies, gestalt of design, semantics and typography, and the application of semiotics and rhetorical tropes to visual communication. Course objectives are to enhance students’ analytical skills and situate graphic design practice in a larger socio-cultural context. Studio six hours.

ART 3332. Design Methods
Prerequisites: ART 2104, ART 3102 and ART 3302.

This course includes a survey of research methods that enhance creative conceptualization abilities and provide research-based evidence that supports design decisions. Students examine case studies; analyze secondary research; experience various contextual research methods; and conduct and apply primary research that uses a variety of design methods (interview, observational and participatory). Lecture and studio four hours.

ART 3602. Special Topics in Graphic Design

Students examine in detail a specialty area in graphic communication, through discussion, research and creative studio work. Examples of topics might include: illustration; exhibition design; packaging design; publication design. Content to vary; may be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate. Studio six hours.

ART 3900. Internship

Supervised placement in a setting which provides an opportunity for students to observe and practice various art and design related skills. Supervision and evaluation by the site supervisor and the faculty member. Graded on a S/U basis.

ART 4102. Typography III
Prerequisites: ART 2026, ART 2103 and ART 3102.

Third course in Typography sequence will stress the dynamic relationships among content, form and context to gain a deeper understanding of systems at many levels. Other topics may include packaging and expressive, environmental, dynamic, interactive typography. Studio six hours.

ART 4192. Graphic Design Senior Seminar
Prerequisites: ART 3202 and ART 4102.

This course prepares students for their final senior design project in ART 4202, Graphic Design Senior Studio (GEN ED: Capstone Experience). These two courses, taken in sequence, provide an opportunity for advanced students to demonstrate a mature understanding of design practice. Through readings, literature review, and research assignments, the graphic design senior seminar examines contemporary issues in design, the expanding practice of design and addresses the relevance of pre-design stages to the design process as a whole. Students conduct research and locate their interests within the design discipline before producing proposals for their capstone project. Lecture and studio four hours.

ART 4202. Graphic Design Senior Studio
Prerequisites: ART 3202, ART 3226 and ART 4102. GEN ED: Capstone Experience

The culminating course in the graphic design program; stresses development of creativity and technical proficiency; emphasis on pre-professional training in advanced design problems, portfolio preparation and presentation, and related professional skills. Studio six hours.

ART 4302. Interaction Design II
Prerequisites: Art 3102 and ART 3202 or permission of instructor.

This is an advanced graphic design course involving complex interactive projects for the Web and other technologies using dynamic and media-rich interactive media. Projects may include animation, typography in motion, data visualization, interactive exhibits and narratives, and other time-based experiences. Studio six hours.

ART 4312. Graphic Design Professional Practice
Prerequisites: ART 3102 and ART 3202.

Aimed at senior graphic design majors, Graphic Design: Professional Practice is intended to help students transition from student to design professional. The course addresses professional practices in the context of various design disciplines as well as current issues in the field. Students will create self-promotional packages, undertake research and writing that reflects their preparedness for the job search; develop and refine their portfolios; and if possible, visit a design studio or printing facility. Lecture and studio four hours.

Honors

ART 4510. Senior Honors Thesis

Independent research and/or creative project. Honors thesis directed by a member of the Art Department and evaluated by a departmental committee. Prerequisite: completion of six semester hours of Art honors coursework.

ART 4515. Junior/Senior Honors Seminar
Prerequisite: enrollment is by invitation or by permission of the instructor and the departmental honors director

An intensive study of a selected topic in studio art, graphic design, art history, art management, art education, or inter-disciplinary art. Course content will be determined by the instructor. Course may be repeated barring duplication of content.

Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design

ART 2009. Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design I: Fabrication and Stone Setting
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1002, or ART 1020 or ART 1021.

This course will focus on processes for construction with nonferrous metals. Techniques will include basic fabrication, stone setting, forming and the creation of mechanisms. Studio six hours.

ART 3009. Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design II: Casting
Prerequisite: ART 2009 and portfolio review

This course will introduce centrifugal casting, rubber mold making, advanced stone setting, repousse and chasing. Students will continue to develop and incorporate forming and fabrication skills. Studio six hours.

ART 3109. Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design II: Hollowware
Prerequisite: ART 2009 and portfolio review

This course will introduce the smithing processes of raising, stretching, sinking and shell forming used in the creation of both traditional and nontraditional hollowware forms. In addition, students will continue to develop fabrication, stone setting and casting techniques by adapting and integrating them into more complex and sophisticated forms. Studio six hours.

ART 3110. Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design II: Computer Aided Jewelry Design
Prerequisite: ART 2009 and portfolio review

This course will introduce computer aided design and rapid prototyping processes currently used in the field of jewelry design and manufacture. Students will design and create objects using CAD software and rapid prototyping machinery. In addition, students will continue to develop traditional fabrication, stone setting and casting techniques by adapting them to the CADC AM environment. Studio six hours.

ART 3111. Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design II: Enameling
Prerequisite: ART 2009 and portfolio review

This course will introduce the processes of cloisonné, plique-a-jour and champlevé enameling. In addition, students will continue to develop traditional fabrication techniques, adapting and integrating them into their enameling designs. Studio six hours.

ART 4109. Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design IV: Advanced Fabrication, Casting and Hollowware
Prerequisite: ART 3109

Study of advanced techniques and processes appropriate to developing an individual aesthetic in the area of metalsmithing and jewelry design. Students will complete a technical research project. Studio six hours.

ART 4309. Special Topics in Advanced Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design
Prerequisites: two of the following courses: ART 3009, ART 3109, ART 3110, ART 3111

A self-directed advanced course of study in which the student will develop a contract with the instructor that includes project descriptions, selected readings and deadlines. Critiques will take place in both group and individual settings. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

Painting

ART 2100. Painting I
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1003, or ART 1020 or ART 1021

An introduction to the principles of spatial organization and color interaction. Includes exploration of concept, materials and techniques, light, color, form, and space. Studio six hours.

ART 3100. Painting II
Prerequisite: ART 2100 and portfolio review

Further exploration of formal issues such as light, color and space. Additional examination of painting techniques, processes and materials. Emphasis is on more challenging, concept-driven assignments. Studio six hours.

ART 3200. Painting III
Prerequisites: ART 1001, ART 1002, ART 1003, ART 2103, ART 3100 and portfolio review, or permission of the instructor.

An experimental and conceptual approach to painting. Encourages the exploration of conventional and unconventional media and the development of visual sensibility. Includes the study of contemporary issues and the cultivation of individual direction. Studio six hours.

ART 4300. Special Topics in Advanced Painting and Drawing
Prerequisites: ART 2100, ART 3100, and ART 3200 or ART 3103

This is an advanced painting and drawing studio course designed to develop personal vision and critical thinking. Emphasis is on the evolution of formal practice and self-evaluation. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

Photography

ART 2026. Photographic Design I
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1003, or ART 1020 or ART 1021.

An introduction to photography. This course offers a foundation in the basic technical skills and aesthetic knowledge needed to create fine art photography. Historical and contemporary issues, critical thinking, and visual analysis will be emphasized though oral discussion and written documentation. A camera is required per the instructor's directions. Studio six hours.

ART 3050. Digital Photographic Design
Prerequisite: ART 2026 and portfolio review or permission of the instructor.

This course will develop basic skills in digital art photography, building on knowledge gained in ART 2026 (Photographic Design I). Photographic image-making will be explored utilizing digital cameras and image-software. Issues in photography will also be investigated. Readings, discussions, fi eld trips, lectures, research, written assignments and image presentations will be incorporated into the coursework. A DSLR camera is required per the instructor’s directions. Studio six hours.

ART 3226. Photographic Design II
Prerequisite: ART 2026 and portfolio review or permission of the instructor

An intermediate course in fine art photography. The course explores more advanced techniques and processes as well as aesthetic, technical and conceptual problem-solving, critical analysis of image-making and historical and theoretical issues in the field. A camera is required per the instructor's directions. Studio six hours.

ART 3227. Special Topics in Photography
Prerequisite: ART 2026 and portfolio review or permission of the instructor

In this course, students will examine a specialty area in photography through discussion, research, writing, presentations and/or creative studio work. Content may vary. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. A camera is required per the instructor's directions. Studio six hours.

ART 4326. Advanced Photographic Design
Prerequisite: ART 3226 or permission of the instructor

An advanced course in fine art photography. This course is designed to allow students to work at an advanced level in photography, to enhance the aesthetic, intellectual and visual evolution of personal work and to hone critical skills and awareness of historical and theoretical issues in the field. A camera is required per the instructor's directions. Studio six hours.

Printmaking

ART 2025. Printmaking: Relief
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1003, or ART 1020 or ART 1021

A general introduction to printmaking: its history, development, techniques, and processes. Various relief printmaking techniques will be explored such as woodcut, linocut, collagraph, and non-traditional methods. Using additive and reductive processes, students work in black and white and in color, learning the registration and printing of multiple matrices. Traditional, contemporary, and experimental approaches are encouraged. Studio six hours.

ART 2125. Printmaking: Screenprinting
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1003, or ART 1020 or ART 1021

This course introduces photomechanical screenprinting processes and techniques to create original prints. There is an additional emphasis on color theory for printmaking as well as techniques for creating editions and experimental prints. Studio six hours.

ART 3225. Printmaking: Intaglio
Prerequisites: ART 1001, ART 1002, ART 1003 and portfolio review, or permission of the instructor

A general introduction to etching and various techniques associated with traditional and contemporary intaglio printmaking. Students will explore a variety of intaglio effects using plate materials such as zinc, copper, and Plexiglas. Traditional, contemporary, and experimental approaches are encouraged. Studio six hours.

ART 3325. Printmaking: Lithography
Prerequisites: ART 1001, ART 1002, ART 1003 and portfolio review, or permission of the instructor

This course introduces the basic chemistry, processes and techniques of stone, plate, color and photo-lithography. Emphasis is on the technical proficiency and the development of editions that reflect unique pictorial themes. Studio six hours.

ART 3410. Book Arts
Prerequisites: ART 1001, ART 1002, ART 1003 and portfolio review, or permission of the instructor

This course investigates the potential of combining text and image using digital and photo-printmaking techniques to create artists' books with content. There is a secondary focus on mastering binding structures. Studio six hours.

ART 4325. Special Topics in Advanced Printmaking
Prerequisites: at least three of the following courses: ART 2025, ART 2125, ART 3225, ART 3325

This course continues the investigation of techniques and directions introduced in beginning level printmaking courses. Students are expected to refine technical competency through the development of a cohesive body of work that articulates an inventive and conceptual use of the printed image and a clear personal vision. Emphasis will be given to examining advanced processes and contemporary issues in printmaking. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

Sculpture

ART 2101. Sculpture I: Modeling and Casting
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1002, or ART 1020 or ART 1021.

An introduction to sculptural ideas and concepts developed through modeling in clay, wax and plaster molding processes. An introduction to foundry casting includes basic sand casting and plaster investment processes. Studio six hours.

ART 2201. Sculpture I: Carving and Construction
Prerequisites: ART 1001 and ART 1002, or ART 1020 or ART 1021.

An introduction to sculptural ideas and concepts developed through carving in stone and wood and additive construction in materials such as welded steel. The student is introduced to the use of specialized hand and power tools including pneumatic chisels and die grinders as well as power sanders and grinders required for shaping and finishing stone, wood and steel. Studio six hours.

ART 3201. Sculpture II: Contemporary Issues
Prerequisites: ART 2101 and ART 2201 and portfolio review

Intermediate focus on traditional and/or experimental sculptural processes, media or techniques. Topics to be considered may include installation art, digital art, performance art or site specific sculpture as well as in-depth study of traditional media. Course content will vary from semester to semester. Studio six hours.

ART 4301. Special Topics in Advanced Sculpture
Prerequisite: ART 3201

An advanced development of sculptural expression. The students will be expected to develop a personal approach to sculptural content and style as well as develop standards of critical judgment in the analysis of their own work. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

Art Majors

ART 2016. Introduction to Contemporary Issues in Art and Design
This course will fulfill requirements for an Art Minor and is an elective possibility for majors in Art Management, Art History and Art Education.

An introductory exploration of contemporary studio practice, with a specific thematic focus. Students will use sketchbook development, material experimentation, and visual research in their study of specific class themes. Projects will introduce a variety of two dimensional, three dimensional, and time-based media. Sample themes may include contemporary ideas in international culture, technology, history, and social and environmental causes. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

ART 2104. Digital Imaging
Prerequisites: ART 1001, ART 1002, and ART 1003 or ART 1020 and ART 1021 for declared Art Management majors.

This course introduces the student to technical and aesthetic aspects of digital image manipulation for artists and designers. Studio six hours.

ART 2500. Independent Study
Prerequisite: permission of the departmental chair

Majors in art may broaden and intensify their program through individual research and involvement in a given area of art.

ART 3013. Introduction to New York/Washington Art Scene

The ASU-NY Loft and/or the Appalachian House in Washington are bases from which visiting groups of students will experience the art museums and galleries in each city. Trips to these cities, organized by art faculty, allow students to gain one semester hour credit. Individual projects are assigned by the instructor leading each trip. May be repeated for a total of three hours credit.

ART 3500. Independent Study

Majors in art may broaden and intensify their program through individual research and involvement in a given area of art. Prerequisite: permission of the departmental chair.

ART 3520. Instructional Assistance
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing

A supervised experience in the instructional process on the university level through direct participation in a classroom situation. Graded on an S/U basis. May be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours. Approved contract required.

ART 3521 Technical Assistant
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and permission of the instructor

A supervised experience in which students will provide technical laboratory assistance in media-based studios and computer-related facilities. Graded on an S/U basis. Course may be repeated two times for a total of 3 credits.

ART 3522. Research Assistant
Prerequisites: Declared art major with Junior or Senior standing and permission of the instructor.

A supervised experience in which the student collaborates on a faculty member's project under the direction of a faculty member. A student may also undertake his/her own research if it is relevant to that of the faculty member. Graded on an S/U basis. May be repeated for a total credit of six semester hours.

ART 3530–3549. Selected Topics
ART 3900. Internship

Supervised placement in a setting which provides an opportunity for students to observe and practice various art and design related skills. Supervision and evaluation by the site supervisor and the faculty member. Graded on a S/U basis.

ART 4551. Studio Workshop

An intensive course to be offered in selected media such as drawing, printmaking, painting, photography, sculpture, clay, fibers, alloys, computer graphics, and others. Prerequisite: portfolio review or permission of the instructor.

Studio Art Majors

ART 3015. Sophomore/Junior Studio Seminar
Prerequisites: ART 1001, ART 1002, ART 1003, and ART 1005

Designed primarily for students seeking the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Studio Art, this course will explore what a BFA in Studio Art is, the kind of training a BFA student can expect to receive, and the role of and expectations for the BFA degree in the contemporary art world. This course also provides a global and integrated introduction to the theory and practice of art making as it informs and is informed by the many institutions comprising the art world. It will explore various rationales and strategies for making, promoting, and displaying art. Lecture and studio four hours.

ART 3140. Professional Practice: Studio Art
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.

This course will provide students with the opportunity, support and direction to begin their professional lives. It focuses on considering the options available with an undergraduate degree in art, and on acquiring the practical skills and knowledge vital for a professional life in a creative field. Students will learn about the pragmatics of a creative career, and understand what steps to take toward that career. Appropriate for students in all Art Department degree tracks. Lecture and studio four hours.

ART 4351. Senior Seminar
Prerequisites: ART 3015 and completion of a minimum of 27 semester hours of studio electives. Prerequisite or corequisite: at least one of the following courses: ART 4300, ART 4301, ART 4307, ART 4308, ART 4309, ART 4325, ART 4326

This senior seminar course prepares students for creating a coherent body of work in ART 4852 (Senior Studio). These two courses, taken in sequence, provide an opportunity for advanced students to demonstrate an emerging intellectual, visual and technical maturity in respect to their own work. Senior Seminar includes planning and writing an exhibition proposal; reading relevant art criticism and theory; writing a research paper; and documenting the progress of one's work through sketches, models, and oral presentations. This course is an opportunity for students to articulate meaningful ideas and integrate them with studio practice.

ART 4852. Senior Studio
Prerequisite: ART 4351. GEN ED: Capstone Experience

Senior Studio is the capstone studio experience for BFA Studio Art majors. This course carries on and brings to resolution the conceptual, technical and studio practices begun in Senior Seminar. Students will demonstrate an emerging intellectual, visual and technical maturity by producing a body of work for exhibition. Students will also write process statements and deliver a series of oral presentations critically analyzing their works in progress. This course addresses issues relevant to becoming a professional artist. A committee of three faculty members will evaluate each student's work. Studio six hours.

Minors and Non-Majors

ART 1001. Foundations I
Prerequisite: portfolio admission into the Department of Art

Basic introduction to two-dimensional design emphasizing the structural elements of art, the principles of visual organization, and the psychological effects of visual decision making. Color theory, including schematic uses and historical and psychological aspects, will be explored along with the application of color mixing and color integration. There will be an introduction to the critical and analytical approaches to the visual arts. Studio six hours.

ART 1002. Foundations II
Prerequisite: ART 1001

This course is the second half of an introduction to the structural elements of art. It examines the organizational principles of three-dimensional design and the study of equipment and materials used in this area of art making. Emphasis is on three-dimensional vocabulary, understanding of sculptural space, the use of hand and power tools, materials manipulation, and processes related to three-dimensional art. Studio six hours.

ART 1003. Foundations Drawing
Prerequisite: portfolio admission into the Department of Art

An introduction to drawing as a primary means of visual investigation. Major class topics include drawing from observation and visualization (drawing from imagination). Class exercises focus on rendering objects, spaces, and the human figure in basic wet and dry media (graphite, charcoal, and ink). Conceptual and process-centered approaches in contemporary drawing will be introduced. Studio six hours.

ART 1020. Core Studio I

Introduction to two-dimensional studio experience, combining practices in 2D design, drawing, painting, and collage. This course focuses on making and interpreting images through sketch exercises, creative visual research, and long-term mixed media projects. Studio six hours.

ART 1021. Core Studio II

Introduction to three-dimensional and four dimensional studio practices combining practices in 3D design, object making, and time based media. This course focuses on making and interpreting forms and actions through sketch exercises, creative visual, research, and long-term mixed media projects. Studio six hours.

ART 2016. Introduction to Contemporary Issues in Art and Design
This course will fulfill requirements for an Art Minor and is an elective possibility for majors in Art Management, Art History and Art Education.

An introductory exploration of contemporary studio practice, with a specific thematic focus. Students will use sketchbook development, material experimentation, and visual research in their study of specific class themes. Projects will introduce a variety of two dimensional, three dimensional, and time-based media. Sample themes may include contemporary ideas in international culture, technology, history, and social and environmental causes. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

Courses for Non-Majors
ART 1004. Visual Arts Exhibition Guide

Students will familiarize themselves with current exhibitions of the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts, research aspects of the exhibitions, prepare educational materials, and give tours to groups and individuals. Open to art majors and non-art majors. Lecture/practicum one hour per week. May be repeated for a total of six semester hours credit.

ART 1020. Core Studio I

Introduction to two-dimensional studio experience, combining practices in 2D design, drawing, painting, and collage. This course focuses on making and interpreting images through sketch exercises, creative visual research, and long-term mixed media projects. Studio six hours.

ART 1021. Core Studio II

Introduction to three-dimensional and four dimensional studio practices combining practices in 3D design, object making, and time based media. This course focuses on making and interpreting forms and actions through sketch exercises, creative visual, research, and long-term mixed media projects. Studio six hours.

ART 2011. Introduction to Visual Arts
GEN ED: Fine Arts Designation; Local to Global Perspective (Theme: "Identity, Culture, and Media"); Historical and Social Perspective (Theme: "Cultural Diversity")

This course covers selected historical and contemporary issues, the formal structure and critical analysis of the visual arts and an examination of art's relationship to ideas, beliefs and culture. Students will develop a critical understanding of art as a manifestation of broader social, historical, and contemporary issues in a global context. Lecture three hours.

ART 2016. Introduction to Contemporary Issues in Art and Design
This course will fulfill requirements for an Art Minor and is an elective possibility for majors in Art Management, Art History and Art Education.

An introductory exploration of contemporary studio practice, with a specific thematic focus. Students will use sketchbook development, material experimentation, and visual research in their study of specific class themes. Projects will introduce a variety of two dimensional, three dimensional, and time-based media. Sample themes may include contemporary ideas in international culture, technology, history, and social and environmental causes. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course for a total credit of nine semester hours. Studio six hours.

ART 2019. Art for Social Change
GEN ED: Aesthetic Perspective (Theme: "Social Change Through the Arts"); Historical and Social Perspective (Theme: "Revolutions and Social Change")

This course combines an introductory studio course with an examination of the way in which art can contribute to social change. Studio assignments will involve students in the investigation, understanding and application of artistic methods and the principles of design while thematically exploring contemporary social issues. Lectures, class discussions and project critiques are geared to develop students' awareness of how art can address social issues. Studio six hours.

ART 2022. Cultivating Creative Expression Through Visual Art
GEN ED: Fine Arts Designation; Aesthetic Perspective (Theme: "Cultivating Creative Expression")

Students will create works of visual art in various media, reflecting on the creative process, the influence of culture, and the dynamic and reciprocal interactions among the artist, instructor, and student. Lecture and studio four hours.

ART 2030. Art from Prehistory to 1400
GEN ED: Fine Arts Designation; Historical and Social Perspective (Themes: "Ancient Worlds" and "Religion, Myth, and Society")

A global survey of art history focusing on the early visual artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas from the dawn of art to 1400. The course examines visual art and art making in religious, social, cultural, and political contexts. Lecture three hours.

ART 2130. Art from 1400 to the Present
GEN ED: Fine Arts Designation; Aesthetic Perspective (Theme: "Traditions and Innovations"); Local to Global Perspective (Theme: "Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization")

A global survey of art history from 1400 to the present examining the later artistic traditions of Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas. The course focuses on visual art and art making in light of changing social, political, religious, and cultural circumstances. Lecture three hours.